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    Most haunted villages around the world

    Villages often regarded as quiet small places where the atmosphere is full of history. However sometimes that history can come back to haunt the town and in the cases the village is making a list here leave them at some of the most sinister and plagued places in the world

    Bramshott England

    As many will know one of the most regarded and highly haunted places in the UK is of pluckley village. However head another 90 minutes down the road and you come across very strange haunted village called Bramshott. The village itself has been around since before 1086 by the 17 hundreds the village had an in call seven thorns where a variety of crimes took place,   Including murder.

    Roughly around the same time that these violent crimes were happening the sightings of the paranormal began and continue to the story contained within the village of Bramshott is believed to be 17 ghost including mistress buttler who apparently dwells around the river in which she drowned herself in 1745.

    Check Out this post to learn more about the haunted village of Bramshott [http://coolinterestingstuff.com/bramshott-the-most-haunted-village-in-england]

    Borgvattnet Sweden

    This village located in northern Sweden is apparently known to have one of the most haunted houses in the whole country. The original old vicarage was constructive in 1976 and reports of ghost came in as early as 1927 when the chaplain of the time nils headland reported his clothes being pulled down from the washing line by an unseen hand. Following that in the 1930s a priest witnessed an old woman appeared in his room when he tried to follow her she quickly disappeared and later in 1945 another chaplain by the name of Eric lingren reported a disturbing occurrence in which he was thrown out of his chair on multiple occasions by an entity he could not see.

    Reports of the Ports of paranormal continue to this day

    Check Out this post to learn more about the haunted village of Borgvattnet [http://coolinterestingstuff.com/borgvattnet-the-haunted-vicarage-sweden]

    Lawers Scotland

    Although the only remnants of the village of lawers in Scotland are that of ruins the side has recently been put up for sale however this offer does come with a warning the village was apparently and allegedly cursed by the Lady of Lawers. The lady who was identified as a soothsayer from the 17th century is reported to have cursed an ash tree on the site. A former by the name of John Campbell cut down the cursed tree in 1895 and shortly after was horrifically God by his own ball he subsequently died from his injuries and the neighbour who attempted to help him was mysteriously sent to An insane mental institution. To this day records of a female figure walking around the land continue.

    Check Out this post to learn more about the haunted village of Lawers [https://www.transceltic.com/blog/old-village-of-lawers-and-famous-17th-century-scottish-soothsayer]

    Voltri Italy

    A monk’s the very small village of voltage in Italy stands an ominous looking house next to an all too familiar winding road was once and in reportedly owned by a family that suffered from mental issues. Is reported that the family would drop heavy objects on the sleeping customers who would then later died terrible deaths by you for being crushed or suffocated to death its reported that they would then steal from the dead guests over that be there money or belongings before piling the bodies into a mass grave.

    This is still reported to this day that the victim spirit walks around the very ominous house unable to move on.

    Check Out this post to learn more about the haunted village of Lawers [https://www.thelocal.it/20161031/five-of-italys-most-haunted-places]

    Oradour-Sur-glane France

    On June 10th 1944 the Nazis invaded the village of Oradour-sur-glane. They went on to separate the women and children from the men after which they brutally shot the man in the legs and then disposed of them by lighting them on fire. Only 5 of the men managed to escape the Killing scene. The soldiers then we’re done to show the women and children with machine guns and grenades as a failed gas bomb left them without other options. After all of this killing, the soldiers then went on to decimate all of the surrounding houses by lighting them on fire. Winter new village was established in 1958 many of the new residents refuse to step on the ruins of the old Village claiming that they could see the spirits of the dead children women and men roaming the streets at night and many recorded the foul stench of burning flesh and wood coming from the old Village.

    Check Out this post to learn more about the haunted village of Lawers [http://www.maison-hantee.net/le-village-doradour-sur-glane-est-il-hante/]

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    3 Scary Haunted Places in Germany

    Würzburg

    By Matthäus Merian – Peace Palace Library, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32643769

    There is supposedly the ghost of a dead nun walking through the halls of Praemonstratenser Abbey. The ghost is said to be that of Maria Renata Von Mossau, accused of mixing herbs into everyone’s food in order to bewitch them. The nun was taken to be executed only three days after her sentencing in court. She was first decapitated, and then burned and her ashes scattered. To this day, there are reports of her walking down the hallways and holding a bouquet of roses while picking off the petals, leaving a trail across the grounds.

    Wolfsegg Castle

    By Traveler100 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
    This 14th-century castle was supposed to be a sanctuary for travellers. The folklore of this haunting originated from the 1500s, when Ulrich von Laaber hired two young farmers to kill his wife, Klara von Helfenstein, after discovering she was having an affair. Soon thereafter, Ulrich and his sons also died suddenly. There have been reports of strange noises coming out of a cave area near the castle. Several expeditions into the cave, uncovering numerous animal skeletons, leading locals to decide the noises had come from hunters who were hiding their prey. While the cave noises might have been solved, this has not been the case of the haunting of the “White Woman” who is still restlessly making her rounds of the castle

    Nordkirchen Castle

    By Mbdortmund (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
    The castle was built between 1703 and 1734. According to the legend, at the full moon and on certain foggy nights, a few people have reported seeing a luxurious carriage with stallions running through the grounds.

    All content within this article was obtained and I used under Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

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    The Story of The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall

    The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall is a ghost that reportedly haunts Raynham Hall in Norfolk, England. It became one of the most famous hauntings in Great Britain when photographers from Country Life magazine claimed to have captured its image. The “Brown Lady” is so named because of the brown brocade dress it is claimed she wears.

    By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26302476

    The Story Of The Brown Lady Of Raynham Hall

    According to legend, the “Brown Lady of Raynham Hall” is the ghost of Lady Dorothy Walpole (1686–1726), the sister of Robert Walpole, generally regarded as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. She was the second wife of Charles Townshend, who was notorious for his violent temper. The story says that when Townshend discovered that his wife had committed adultery with Lord Wharton he punished her by locking her in her rooms in the family home, Raynham Hall. According to Mary Wortley Montagu, Dorothy was in fact entrapped by the Countess of Wharton. She invited Dorothy over to stay for a few days knowing that her husband would never allow her to leave, not even to see her children. She remained at Raynham Hall until her death in 1726 from smallpox.

    Sightings

    The first recorded claim of a sighting of the ghost was by Lucia C. Stone concerning a gathering at Raynham Hall in the Christmas of 1835. Stone says that Lord Charles Townshend had invited various guests to the Hall, including a Colonel Loftus, to join in the Christmas festivities. Loftus and another guest named Hawkins said they had seen the “Brown Lady” one night as they approached their bedrooms, noting in particular the dated brown dress she wore. The following evening Loftus claimed to have seen the “Brown Lady” again, later reporting that on this occasion he was drawn to the spectre’s empty eye-sockets, dark in the glowing face. Loftus’ sightings led to some staff permanently leaving Raynham Hall.

    All content within this article was obtained and I used under Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

    If you do have a copyright issue with any of the content within this article please email me at ryan@top5lists.co.uk and I will be happy to remove it from the article

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    England’s Most Haunted House | The Borley Rectory

    Borley Rectory was a Victorian house that gained fame as “the most haunted house in England” after being described as such by Harry Price. Built in 1862 to house the rector of the parish of Borley and his family, it was badly damaged by fire in 1939 and demolished in 1944.

    The Hauntings

    The first paranormal events reportedly occurred in about 1863, since a few locals later remembered having heard unexplained footsteps within the house at about that time. On 28 July 1900, four daughters of the rector, Henry Dawson Ellis Bull, saw what they thought was the ghost of a nun at twilight, about 40 yards (37 m) from the house; they tried to talk to it, but it disappeared as they got closer. The local organist, Ernest Ambrose later said that the family at the rectory were “very convinced that they had seen an apparition on several occasions”. Various people claimed to have witnessed a variety of puzzling incidents, such as a phantom coach driven by two headless horsemen, during the next four decades. Bull died in 1892 and his son, the Reverend Henry (“Harry”) Foyster Bull, took over the living.

    Lionel Foyster wrote an account of various strange incidents that occurred between the time the Foysters moved in and October 1935, which was sent to Harry Price. These included bell-ringing, windows shattering, throwing of stones and bottles, wall-writing and the locking of their daughter in a room with no key. Marianne Foyster reported to her husband a whole range of poltergeist phenomena that included her being thrown from her bed. On one occasion, Adelaide was attacked by “something horrible”. Foyster tried twice to conduct an exorcism, but his efforts were fruitless; in the middle of the first exorcism, he was struck in the shoulder by a fist-size stone. Because of the publicity in the Daily Mirror, these incidents attracted the attention of several psychic researchers, who after investigation were unanimous in suspecting that they were caused, consciously or unconsciously, by Marianne Foyster. She later said that she felt that some of the incidents were caused by her husband in concert with one of the psychic researchers, but other events appeared to her to be genuine paranormal phenomena. She later admitted that she was having a sexual relationship with the lodger, Frank Pearless, and that she used paranormal explanations to cover up her liaisons. The Foysters left Borley in October 1935 as a result of Lionel Foyster’s ill health

    All content within this article was obtained and I used under Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

    If you do have a copyright issue with any of the content within this article please email me at ryan@top5lists.co.uk and I will be happy to remove it from the article

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    7 Photos of Ghostly Apparitions Captured in Haunted Hospitals and Insane Asylums

    Hospitals are for many the pinnacle of haunting material. They are the one place in the world that people are both born and die. However, for those who die, do they move onto the other side in peace, or do they stay on forever. In this post, we’re going to be looking at 7 of the strangest and most haunting photographs ever taken in one of these buildings. 

    Waverly Hills Shadowman

    After learning about Waverly Hills haunted prominence, a courageous thrill-seeking lone traveller chose to go and investigate Waverly’s paranormal activity for himself. He took this photograph while roaming the rooms of the sanatorium, and asserts he was alone at all times and was shocked to see this dark figure next to a gurney captured in one of his photos. Is this the spirit of a former patient still wandering the hallways 

     

    Radnor Lunatic Asylum Ghost 

    • Adam Smith captured more on camera than he’d bargained for when he took a photograph of the abandoned Brecon and Radnor Lunatic Asylum in Brecon, Wales. Smith was walking past the building when he spotted what appears to be a shadowy figure looking right back at him from the first-floor window of the former psychiatric hospital. He was more than a little surprised considering the building has been closed and sealed up for more than 15 years.
    • Freddy Jackson Ghost

    The following is a photo of Sir Victor Goddard’s squadron, men who had served in World War 1 on the HMS Daedalus This ghostly face was assumed to belong to that of Freddy Jackson, an air mechanic inadvertently killed two days prior by an aeroplane propeller All the men in this photo verified it was Jackson’s face, as his funeral was being held that day.

    The Falling Body Photograph 

    This picture shows a very creepy event. The Cooper family moved into their new home in Texas, a picture is taken and when it’s developed, a figure emerges from the ceiling. There isn’t much setting here, it could be real, it could be fake, but there’s no way to distinguish for sure.

    Brown Lady Of Raynham Hall

    photographers from Country Life magazine took this snapshot in Raynham Hall, Norfolk. The story went in 1835, a houseguest in the Hall noticed a phantom in a brown dress, eyes gouged out, wandering the halls. To this day nobody can explain what this white image in the photo could be, though sceptics argue it lacks a good deal of authenticity

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    4 Incredibly Haunted Places In The United Kingdom

    Borley Rectory

    Borley Rectory was a Victorian house that gained fame as “the most haunted house in England” after being described as such by Harry Price. Built in 1862 to house the rector of the parish of Borley and his family, it was badly damaged by fire in 1939 and demolished in 1944.

    The first paranormal events reportedly occurred in about 1863, since a few locals later remembered having heard unexplained footsteps within the house at about that time. On 28 July 1900, four daughters of the rector, Henry Dawson Ellis Bull, saw what they thought was the ghost of a nun at twilight, about 40 yards (37 m) from the house; they tried to talk to it, but it disappeared as they got closer. The local organist, Ernest Ambrose later said that the family at the rectory were “very convinced that they had seen an apparition on several occasions”. Various people claimed to have witnessed a variety of puzzling incidents, such as a phantom coach driven by two headless horsemen, during the next four decades. Bull died in 1892 and his son, the Reverend Henry (“Harry”) Foyster Bull, took over the living.

    50 Berkeley Square

    50 Berkeley Square is a reportedly haunted townhouse on Berkeley Square in Mayfair, Central London. In the late 19th century it became known as one of the most haunted houses in London. Researchers have since suggested an entirely rational explanation for the alleged phenomena that involved the house’s occupant, Thomas Myers. It has also been noted that many of the stories about the house were exaggerated or invented by later writers about its ghosts.

    he legend about the house varies, but most versions state that the attic room of the house is haunted by the spirit of a young woman who committed suicide there.She purportedly threw herself from a top-floor window after being abused by her uncle and is said to be capable of frightening people to death. The spirit is said to take the form of a brown mist, though sometimes it is reported as a white figure. A rarer version of the tale is that a young man was locked in the attic room, fed only through a hole in the door, until he eventually went mad and died. Another story is that the attic room is haunted by the ghost of a little girl who was killed there by a sadistic servant.

    Tower of London

    Bob Collowan/Commons/CC-BY-SA-4.0

    Anne Boleyn was beheaded in 1536 for treason against Henry VIII; her ghost supposedly haunts the chapel of St Peter ad Vincula, where she is buried, and has been said to walk around the White Tower carrying her head under her arm. This haunting is commemorated in the 1934 comic song “With Her Head Tucked Underneath Her Arm”. Other reported ghosts include Henry VI, Lady Jane Grey, Margaret Pole, and the Princes in the Tower. In January 1816, a sentry on guard outside the Jewel House claimed to have witnessed an apparition of a bear advancing towards him, and reportedly died of fright a few days later. In October 1817, a tubular, glowing apparition was claimed to have been seen in the Jewel House by the Keeper of the Crown Jewels, Edmund Lenthal Swifte. He said that the apparition hovered over the shoulder of his wife, leading her to exclaim: “Oh, Christ! It has seized me!” Other nameless and formless terrors have been reported, more recently, by night staff at the Tower.

    Brown Lady of Raynham Hall

    By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26302476

    The first recorded claim of a sighting of the ghost was by Lucia C. Stone concerning a gathering at Raynham Hall in the Christmas of 1835. Stone says that Lord Charles Townshend had invited various guests to the Hall, including a Colonel Loftus, to join in the Christmas festivities. Loftus and another guest named Hawkins said they had seen the “Brown Lady” one night as they approached their bedrooms, noting in particular the dated brown dress she wore. The following evening Loftus claimed to have seen the “Brown Lady” again, later reporting that on this occasion he was drawn to the spectre’s empty eye-sockets, dark in the glowing face. Loftus’ sightings led to some staff permanently leaving Raynham Hall.

    The next reported sighting of the “Brown Lady” was made in 1836 by Captain Frederick Marryat, a friend of novelist Charles Dickens, and the author of a series of popular sea novels. It is said that Marryat requested that he spend the night in the haunted room at Raynham Hall to prove his theory that the haunting was caused by local smugglers anxious to keep people away from the area

    All content within this article was obtained and I used under Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0)

    If you do have a copyright issue with any of the content within this article please email me at ryan@top5lists.co.uk and I will be happy to remove it from the article

  • EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY, PENNSYLVANIA, UNITED STATES

    The Eastern State Penitentiary, also known as ESP, is a former American prison in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[5] It is located at 2027 Fairmount Avenue between Corinthian Avenue and North 22nd Street in the Fairmount section of the city, and was operational from 1829 until 1971

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